Diabetes

Numerous clinical studies have shown that type-II diabetics have higher systolic and diastolic viscosity than healthy non-diabetic people.

Patients with metabolic syndrome have higher viscosity than those without, and viscosity scores can predict incident diabetes in initially non-diabetic adults.

In a study of 128 obese patients (BMI > 28 kg/m2) and 90 non-obese healthy controls, diastolic blood viscosity was 15% higher in obese vs. non-obese patients. The report published in the International Journal of Obesity stated: “Blood viscosity is abnormal in obese patients with normal lipid parameters …the degree of obesity influences blood rheology.”

   

Additional Clinical Evidence


Sources:

Lowe GDO, Lowe JM, Drummond MM, et al. Blood Viscosity in Young Male Diabetics with and without Retinopathy. Diabetologia 1980; 18:359-363.

Peduzzi M, Melli M, Fonda S, et al. Comparative evaluation of blood viscosity in diabetic retinopathy. Int Ophthalmol 1984; 7:15-19.

Skovborg F, Nielsen AV, Schlichtkrull J, Dietzel J. Blood viscosity in diabetic patients, Lancet 1966; 15:129-131.

Rillaerts E, van Gaal L, et al. Blood Viscosity in Human Obesity: Relation to Glucose Tolerance and Insulin Status. Int J Obes. 1989; 13:739-45.

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